Choirs


Richard runs 3 choirs including a lunchtime one at Monash Hospital.

 

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Group Singing for Wellness and Performance

 

Group singing with Richard Lawton can have a significant impact on an individual’s capacity for expression in any arena. Many people find that their self-confidence and ability to openly express ideas increases as their voice gets stronger. Richard has extensive expertise in assisting men and women in re-claiming their authentic and powerful voice.

 

Participants in lunch time singing groups, most of whom spend their morning sitting down, have commented that after a 45 minute singing session, they notice a remarkable increase in energy, mental clarity, enthusiasm and resilience levels.

 

“ I find I’m more mentally alert and active during the afternoons”
Penny Paton: Dialysis Co-ordinator: Monash Hospital

 

“ It not only energises us, it actually makes a difference to how we get through the rest of the day.”
Sally Ross: Admin Manager: Monash Hospital

 

“I come to our choir feeling rushed and tense, and leave feeling relaxed energized and positive.”
Robyn Charlwood: Senior Specialist at a major bank

 

A 2008 UNESCO study* lists the benefits of group singing as

– Increased self confidenc
– Empowerment
– Well being
– Interpersonal skills
– Increased clarity and enthusiasm – General lifting of the spirits – Sense of joy and accomplishment
– Lowered feelings of social isolation, depression and anxiety
– Denser social and friendship networks

 

There is now ample research that shows that group singing raises endorphin levels, and therefore reduces stress in the workplace. Richard’s singing groups have been known to create community, a sense of cohesive team, and act as a valuable
trust-building and communication tool.

 

Basic Programme:

 

Forty-five minute session once per week
Minimum of 10 participants and a maximum of 25

 

Individual Sessions:

 

Can quickly resolve a lot of problems concerning Influencing and Communication. Richard has 25 years of experience in this field.

 

* www.abp.unimelb.edu.au/unesco/ejournal/vol-two-issue-one.html